Intel partners with Thomas Edison

New chip shown expanded and positioned on a mother board

Intel® Edison compute module shown expanded and positioned on a mother board

Hey … all you struggling entrepreneurs, inventors and developers out there!

Intel has a new developer compute module, named the “Intel® Edison”, to help you create products for the Internet of Things (“IOT”), cheaply and efficiently. This module contains a processor, memory, storage, WiFi and bluetooth communications in a tiny package. Integrating all of these elements together is what inventor-developers of all ages and maturity find very useful? The new Intel® Edison can shorten the new product development cycle by 6 – 9 months; and save a bundle of development expense.

New chip –not much bigger than a postage stamp

Intel® Edison compute module – not much bigger than a postage stamp

The Intel® Edison is named in honor of the world’s greatest inventor Thomas Edison; a man who for decades revolutionized our world through continuous experimentation and rapid prototyping by finding out quickly what the market was interested in and at what price. Edison pioneered the invention factory concept, managing 30-40 new product development teams at a time. Edison did not just invent things, he created whole new industries.

The module was designed to help small companies and developer teams accomplish the same goals as Edison. Intel’s goal was to make it super easy for these entrepreneurs / developers to try out their ideas. Some of their products may fuel the next industrial revolution.

Multi-application service robot

Multi-application service robot

Today, there are a little over 14 billion connected devices. Many serve a broad market such as smartphones, computers and servers. They are created by big companies with large development budgets. In the future, the connected devices ( 50 billion-Est.) will become more personalized (infant onesies, animal trackers and robots- see photo below). This is where the Intel® Edison will shine, in the hands of nimble, entrepreneurial, inventive companies and individual developers.

There is a recent example of a 12 year old who was frustrated because a braille copier for the blind cost $2,000. Using the Intel® Edison module, he reduced the number of parts and the price to $200. Intel is now funding the commercialization of his product. USAToday carried a detailed story on this project.

Edison would be proud to have his name on these new modules and in the hands of those who live by the Edison inventive spirit. Are you ready to break some paradigms! What will you make?

Check it out:

Thomas Edison on Time Magazine“To have a great idea, have a lot of them.”

Time ® is a registered trademark of Time Inc.

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Thomas Edison on Failure

The MOOCS are Coming, The MOOCS are Coming!So how do you take failure? Do you simply move onto something else, or do you double-down and take another cut at the challenge that just floored you? Do you have a rep at work or with friends that characterizes you as someone who never gives up?

Thomas Edison was fond of saying … “I can never find the things that work best until I know the things that don’t work.”

That “Edisonian” style of stubborn perseverance is often the hallmark of successful inventors and entrepreneurs … people who change the world. When searching for the right, long-life filament for his nascent electric light bulb technology, legend has it the great inventor tried several thousand different materials, before he found the right one.

“Results! Why man, I have gotten a lot of results. I know several thousand things that won’t work.”

Remember this important fact. During Edison’s career, he filled 4,000 laboratory notebooks-about 3200 of them were the large ledger type volumes and 800 were small notebooks. This is the kind of man who carefully documented and constantly re-visited his notes to look for places for improvement- always learning from failure.

While perfecting his famous nickel-iron storage batteries, he is said to have quipped to a reporter’s admonishment on his lack of success …

“I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Undaunted, Thomas Edison went on to develop a legendary battery that was used in many applications the world over; in fact, it was probably his most profitable product.

At the Edison Foundations we find great guidance in Edison’s work ethic and never give-up attitude. This valuable advice came early in life from his mother, Nancy Elliot Edison, who home-schooled the young boy.

We have coined our own version of Mr. Edison’s spirit, “Fail your way to success!”

Thomas Edison on Time MagazineThomas Edison said ……“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

Time ® is a registered trademark of Time Inc.

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Giving Tuesday: December 2, 2014

PLEASE HELP SUPPORT OUR CAUSE ON GIVING TUESDAY

PLEASE HELP SUPPORT OUR CAUSE ON GIVING TUESDAY

Please consider making a contribution on Giving Tuesday to the efforts of the Edison Foundation to run the competition, give awards to the winners and stipends to their teachers.  There are no donation minimums but anyone donating before December 31, 2014 will receive one (1)  free music album download (up to $15.00) on Apple I-tunes for each $100.00 contribution.

Edison Innovation Foundation is a non-profit based in Newark, New Jersey that supports science and technology education and the Edison Legacy.

Our Website: ThomasEdison.org
Our Blog: EdisonMuckers.org
Like us on Facebook: Facebook.com/ThomasEdison


ALSO JOIN OUR ALTERNATIVE ENERGY COMPETITION

Thomas Edison in Your Classroom ... Attention Teachers!On October 2014, we announced our 5th Annual Edison Invention Challenge for grades 6 to 12. Students and others are encouraged to create a new invention using alternative technology (wind, solar or fuel cell technology).

In the spring of 2015, the winners and their school and teachers will be announced at an awards event. If you are in grades 6 to 12, you can join the invention challenge. December 8, 2014 is final entry date.

Learn more details by logging onto:EdisonInventionChallenge.org

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