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Intel® Edison 2017 “Tommy” Awards

On March 24th, 2017, Intel and the Edison Innovation Foundation will announce the winners of the “Tommy” award, named in honor of the great inventor, Thomas Edison. The winners are selected because they have used the Intel® Edison multi-function module in ways that epitomize the spirit and creativity of Edison. Last year’s winners can be seen here.

The First Place Winner of the 2016 awards ceremony was Shubham Banerjee for work in using the microprocessor to build his Braille Printer called “Braigo”

The First Place Winner of the 2016 awards ceremony was Shubham Banerjee for work in using the microprocessor to build his Braille Printer called “Braigo”

The Intel® Edison multi-function module is a tiny, SD-card-sized powerhouse designed for building Internet of Things (IoT) and wearable computing products. The Edison module contains a high-speed, dual-core processing unit, integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, low energy, storage and memory, and a broad spectrum of input/output (I/O) options for interfacing with user systems. Because of its small footprint and low power consumption, the Edison module is an ideal choice for projects that need a lot of processing power without being connected to a power supply. All this can lower the barriers to entry for a range of inventors, entrepreneurs, and consumer product designers.

Keep an eye out here for the 2017 winners … coming soon!

Thomas Edison said, “Anything that won’t sell, I don’t want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Thomas Edison Makes Lemonade from Lemons

It’s just a heavy piece of concrete, a part of the old Yankee Stadium actually, but visitors to the Thomas Edison National Historical Park marvel at its form and weight, especially at the thick aggregate mix of stones and gravel within.

Edison Cement in a chunk of Yankee Stadium.

Edison Cement in a chunk of Yankee Stadium.

Yankee Stadium, around 1923.

Yankee Stadium, around 1923.

This is what Edison’s Portland cement makes when properly mixed, a durable concrete that he used to build his factory buildings, garage and potting shed, as well as his concrete homes– and of course Yankee Stadium. About 68,000 barrels of Edison cement went into the construction of Yankee Stadium in 1923.

An Edison concrete house today.

An Edison concrete house today.

All this fine cement … resulted from a failed economic attempt to recoup the iron ore within the rock in mountainous western New Jersey, out by Sparta and Ogdensburg. All he was able to literally glean from this $1 million plus investment (which almost bankrupted him) was a “bag of lemons”. But being Edison, and not wont to give up easily, he was determined to make lemonade from it all.

Realizing the know-how (technology) of rock crushing was a valuable and potentially profitable new business, he switched gears from iron ore to Portland cement and did what he always did when he entered a new industry … he disrupted it. When he was done, the traditional 50-foot kilns used to roast the pre-cement constituents were increased to 200 feet-effectively quadrupling the productivity of a single kiln.

One of Edison’s great rules was never let failure get you down, always learn from it. Can you taste the sweet lemonade he made from rock crushing technology? Look at all the places in our world where cement is used! What an incredible material. All you entrepreneurs, inventors, and world-changers … banish discouragement, and go for it! Make Edison proud.

Thomas Edison said, “Just because something doesn’t do what you planned it to do doesn’t mean it’s useless.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Team Edison Shows Problem Solving in Action!

Thomas Edison had a lab team (i.e. “R+D”), people who could latch onto a problem, no matter how complex or difficult, and solve it. This behavior gave birth to Edison’s highly prized descriptor, “stick-to-it-ness”.

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Kids, students, and budding young inventors can get a taste of what it is like to be Team Edison. Tune on to the new action comedy series–Thomas Edison’s Secret Lab–created by Genius Brands International.

Techno-savvy Team Edison discovers a hidden secret lab, built and stocked by none other than Thomas Edison at his former lab site in West Orange, NJ. See what these young talented minds [and a likable robot, Von Bolt] do with the resources of this lab. Old Tom Edison is there too, in holographic form, to help out and give advice.

There’s Angie, Nicky, Kent, Chang and Von Bolt the robot, to teach STEM principles to young viewers. Entertainment and education in every video … be there with the young ones! See the kids in action–now playing on NETFLIX, THE KID GENIUS channel on XFINITY, and on select PUBLIC TELEVISION stations [check their website for details]. Enjoy!

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