Posts belonging to Category Did You Know?



Thomas Edison Supports Innovative Charitable Giving

So…riddle me this. What is the commonality between mitigating PTSD and improving heart health? These are two programs that exist today because of seed funding from the Charles Edison Fund, the mother foundation of the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Mitigating PTSD
Serenity Stables From Combat to Calm is a Middletown, NJ horse farm-turned –equine- therapy program aimed at helping veterans suffering with disabilities and
post-traumatic stress disorder. Here, therapy horses provide an extra measure of treatment for veterans. The horses act as a spiritual reflection for the 200 veterans who have visited Serenity Farms and experienced some measure of healing through interaction with the beautiful and gentle animals.

Seeking Calm and Peace with Therapy Horses at Serenity Farms. Check out Serenity Stables at www.serenitystablesfcc.org/.

Seeking Calm and Peace with Therapy Horses at Serenity Farms. Check out Serenity Stables at www.serenitystablesfcc.org/.

Charles Edison created his non-profit fund to support the legacy of his father Thomas Edison, and to promote education, specifically careers in science and technology. The programs which focus on the legacy of Thomas Edison, medical research and education at the grammar, high, college and graduate school levels, are the best in the country. Serenity Farms fit into this funding philosophy.

The Living Heart Foundation 
The Living Heart Foundation, public/private collaborative, initially began with a Charles Edison Fund grant, and now with generous support from others, delivers a unique brand of education and health features to diverse communities in need. This is achieved through the creation of mutually beneficial partnerships that include healthcare providers, educators, schools, hospitals, industry and active/retired professional athletes.

The Living Heart Foundation’s mission is fivefold:

  • Generate intense awareness of the importance of CV disease;
  • Perform early detection of CV abnormalities through screening;
  • Create a health stratification database;
  • Track the health data longitudinally;
  • Develop website education and lifestyle programs to empower people to counter adverse effects of persistent health problems;

The results of early detection and intervention through the Foundation’s integrated-preventative approach significantly decrease medical costs compared to persistent, uncorrected abnormalities and increase compliance related to achieving healthcare goals. State-of-the-art technology to deliver information and create interactive programs can be customized as needed.

“Anything that won’t sell, I don’t want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Thomas Edison Salutes Founding Father Inventors

Necessity is the mother of invention as the old adage opines, and taming a wild country certainly qualifies as a necessity. Fascinating it is to realize our founding fathers were inventors as well as statesmen, legislators and leaders. Consider the inventions of our great forefathers…

Franklin Playing His Armonica

Franklin Playing His Armonica

Benjamin Franklin
Bi-focals, the Franklin stove, lightning rod, the glass armonica (musical instrument) and being major supporter of lending libraries, community hospitals, and volunteer fire departments

 

Typical George Washington Wheat Threshing Barn Design

Typical George Washington Wheat Threshing Barn Design

George Washington
Drill plow, wheat threshing barn

 

Jefferson’s Wheel Cipher

Jefferson’s Wheel Cipher

Thomas Jefferson
Iron plow, swivel chair, macaroni press, dumbwaiter, pedometer, folding ladder, and a great clock, wheel cipher

James Madison
Combination walking stick and microscope

Lest we forget, Thomas Jefferson almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia. Jefferson was also the first administrator of the U.S. Patent Office, the formation of which was empowered by law thru the Constitution. This office is probably our oldest federal agency, and one that through its fee schedule for patent application/maintenance essentially pays for itself.

We would be remiss not mentioning an Edison life-long favorite as well, Thomas Paine, noted for inventing a single-span iron bridge and a smokeless candle. Paine may not be as well-known as the great men mentioned above, but many of the documents of the time and discussions about the kind of government we would have derived from Paine’s logic and sometimes incendiary speeches to rally the populace.

Noteworthy is the kind of process thinking that Franklin, like Edison, proposed. Think how lending libraries, hospitals, and fire departments have made a significant and enduring impact on our quality of life.

Thomas Edison would consider his inventive activities in good company with the founding fathers … practical with great utility!

Thomas Edison said, “I find out what the world needs. Then I go ahead and try to invent it.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Intel® Edison 2017 “Tommy” Awards

On March 24th, 2017, Intel and the Edison Innovation Foundation will announce the winners of the “Tommy” award, named in honor of the great inventor, Thomas Edison. The winners are selected because they have used the Intel® Edison multi-function module in ways that epitomize the spirit and creativity of Edison. Last year’s winners can be seen here.

The First Place Winner of the 2016 awards ceremony was Shubham Banerjee for work in using the microprocessor to build his Braille Printer called “Braigo”

The First Place Winner of the 2016 awards ceremony was Shubham Banerjee for work in using the microprocessor to build his Braille Printer called “Braigo”

The Intel® Edison multi-function module is a tiny, SD-card-sized powerhouse designed for building Internet of Things (IoT) and wearable computing products. The Edison module contains a high-speed, dual-core processing unit, integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, low energy, storage and memory, and a broad spectrum of input/output (I/O) options for interfacing with user systems. Because of its small footprint and low power consumption, the Edison module is an ideal choice for projects that need a lot of processing power without being connected to a power supply. All this can lower the barriers to entry for a range of inventors, entrepreneurs, and consumer product designers.

Keep an eye out here for the 2017 winners … coming soon!

Thomas Edison said, “Anything that won’t sell, I don’t want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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