Posts belonging to Category Inventions Edison Would Love



Thomas Edison Admires Transparent Solar Panels

What is it? Michigan State University scientists have developed a transparent solar panel that can be used as a window.

A transparent solar panel

A transparent solar panel

Why does it matter? Clear solar panels could be used to tap the sun’s power in buildings, cars and even tech devices. There are 5 to 7 billion square meters of glass surfaces in the United States, according to the researchers, who say these clear panels have the potential to provide approximately 40 percent of the country’s current energy demands. Besides making new power-generating window panels, the technology could be also used to retrofit existing windows.

How does it work? The MSU team used organic molecules as their secret sauce to create a thin material similar to plastic that captures the sun’s ultraviolet and near-infrared light. Once collected that energy moves to the edge of the window panel, where solar cells converts it to electrical energy.

Dr. Richard Lunt at MSU

Dr. Richard Lunt at MSU

“Highly transparent solar cells represent the wave of the future for new solar applications,” said lead engineering researcher Richard Lunt. While the transparent panels are far less efficient than normal solar panels, buildings have a lot more surface area where they could be deployed. “Ultimately, this technology offers a promising route to inexpensive, widespread solar adoption on small and large surfaces that were previously inaccessible,” Lunt said.

Check this out:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iH04P2fXVgs

Widespread use of highly transparent solar applications, together with the conventional roof-top solar systems we see today, could nearly meet U.S. electricity demand, drastically reducing the use of fossil fuels. Today, only about 1.5 percent of electricity demand in the United States and globally is produced by solar power. Moving global energy consumption away from fossil fuels will require innovative and cost-effective renewable energy technologies like this. The work at MSU is funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Education.

Edison on solar energy – “I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that. I wish I had more years left.”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Thomas Edison Admires Tesla Electric Semi Truck

Better keep an eye on that rear view mirror. Something very new and different could be gaining on you. Tesla is not just about cars. Say hello to the Tesla electric semi truck, a vehicle with attitude, speed and range.

Sleek, futuristic and fast this Tesla semi truck

Sleek, futuristic and fast this Tesla semi truck

Think you could handle it? Aerodynamics that rival some of the fastest automobiles; zero to 60 mph in 20 seconds–with an 80,000 pound pull; and capable of 65 mph on a 5% grade. This baby can go 500 miles on a single charge; with Tesla talking about introducing “megachargers” at truck stops that in 30 minutes can give you another 400 miles of range. This streamlined beauty also can operate in a semiautonomous mode, so it and other trucks can “convoy” their way across the landscape.

Inside the cab. No gears or shifting necessary….one speed…rapid!

Inside the cab. No gears or shifting necessary….one speed…rapid!

Big name companies are putting down $5,000 deposits for first dibs on the production models to become available in 2019. Names like Ryder, Wal-Mart Stores Inc, J.B. Hunt Transport Systems, Anheuser-Busch, and Sysco top the list of first buyers. Expected base price for the futuristic semi is $180,000-$200,000. Various press reports suggest Musk may be sitting on as many as 1200 orders for the new truck-with big name companies ordering over 100 trucks at a time each.

Initial expectations are the trucks will be cheaper to operate than diesel machines and possible less costly than rail transport. And of course there will be no emissions, a big standards concern for traditional trucks and locomotives. Tesla is also offering a one million mile breakdown-free promise.

All in all, Tesla is projecting a $200,000+ savings in fuel costs over conventional trucks, and a 2 year payback. That certainly will get some serious attention from companies operating big truck fleets. Experts believe Tesla will have some interesting competition in the near future as electric fever grips the trucking industry.

Are you hearing this Tom Edison? Look what your ideas back in the early 1900s for battery powered transportation have become.

Thomas Edison said, “If we all did the things we are really capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves …”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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Thomas Edison’s Connection to Radio Astronomy

Today we detect and research radio waves that emanate from stars and other bodies to interpret how the universe works. Credit for the beginnings of this fascinating science and technology stems from 1931. Karl Jansky, a Bell Labs scientist, first built an antenna to reliably detect these radio waves and determine their origin. Five years later, Grote Reber an amateur astronomer, is credited with building the first radio telescope. Since then, world scientists routinely listen to the heavens.

With a diameter of 1,000 feet, The Arecibo Radio Telescope, at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, reigned supreme from 1963 to 2016 as the largest and most recognizable radio telescope in the world. However, the Chinese have now begun operation of a 1,500 foot diameter device. The popular 1997 science fiction movie,” Contact” (based on a detailed and very accurate script written by scientist Carl Sagan and his wife Ann Druyan), chronicles the adventures and frustrations of a scientist from Arecibo who is engaged in interpreting radio signals as a prelude to detecting life on other planets…think SETI…the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. [By the way, see “Contact”, it’s terrific!]

The Arecibo Radio Telescope

The Arecibo Radio Telescope

Let’s return to the birth of radio astronomy in 1931 (coincidentally the death year of Edison), and step back farther in time. It’s 1890 and Edison is very well aware that radio waves exist, as famed scientist Heinrich Hertz proves their existence in the late 1880s [Maxwell of Maxwell’s equations fame had predicted their existence, circa 1865]. For his accomplishments , the unit of frequency — cycle per second — was named the “hertz” in his honor.

In 1890, Arthur Kennelly, an electrical engineer working for Thomas Edison, wrote a letter to the director of the Lick Observatory, describing an interesting proposed experiment being considered by the great inventor that may have been the first radio telescope — forty years before its official invention. Edison’s idea was to wrap a large mass of iron with turns of cable to create a crude radio wave detector. Edison suspected that electromagnetic emissions (radio waves) would be associated with sunspot activity and hoped that Lick Observatory would be able to provide information as to just when these occurred.

Edison’s experiment was never conducted, and in retrospect, the experiment would not have been able to accurately detect the proper wavelength of the radio waves because the Earth’s natural atmospheric boundary layers, the ionosphere, would have absorbed those signals. But the intent was “spot-on”! Curiously, the actual prediction of a reflecting layer in the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, was made by Kennelly and Heaviside in 1902.

This was not Edison’s first interest in astronomy. In the eclipse of 1878, Edison traveled to Rawlins Wyoming with a new invention he was going to use to try and detect the heat in the sun’ corona during the celestial event. Known as a “tasimeter”, the device was able to detect the heat, but was not accurate in determining just how intense it was.

Not bad for a kid from Milan, Ohio who became the world’s greatest inventor and changed the world. His country schoolhouse teacher thought little Tom had severely limited mental capacities. His mother thought otherwise and homeschooled the lad. Wonder how many little “Edison’s” slip by today? The answer may be in the stars!

Edison’s tasimeter

Edison’s tasimeter

Thomas Edison said, “If we all did the things we are really capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves …”

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

Left: Intel-Edison module now available world-wide for developers. Right: The “Tommy” award given by the Edison Innovation Foundation.

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